Where Writers Write: Hannah Jones

After a short hiatus, the Where Writers Write series is back for more glimpses into where our fellow writers actually do their work. Please welcome Hannah Jones to the series this week. If you’d like to share your writing space in this series, shoot me an email at kristinoffilerwrites@gmail.com.

I have a full time editorial position at a social science publishing company (which I love!) so my own writing is something I squeeze into the margins of my daily life.
The academic nature of the non-fiction manuscripts I work with during the day provides a nice balance for when I come home and want to write creatively; primarily, I write young adult and middle grade fiction, short stories, memoir, and am currently hard at work writing a pictorial history book about Byberry State Hospital (in Philadelphia) that is forthcoming from Arcadia Publishing.

Because writing creatively is a treat, I really look forward to and make the best use of the one or two hours of writing time I get.

What is your writing space like?

My writing space is a 6’x 6’ corner of my living room. One desk–the one reserved for blogging, email, and bills–faces the rest of the room, the windows, and the television. The antique writing desk faces the wall and is a strictly computer-free writing space–I prefer to write first drafts by hand–which helps me avoid all distractions while creating something new.

Before I bought my own place about six months ago, I’d never really had my own official and regular writing space. Moving in and out of college dorms, apartments, and my parents’ house always prevented me from both organizing a space and setting up a regular writing routine. Since I moved into my new condo, it’s been an experiment and adventure in figuring out what facilitates my most creative and productive writing process.

At first, I was struggling with having just one desk because it was the catch-all: creative writing, bills, blogging, more bills, and junk mail all piled up on the narrow surface of my antique writing desk. Knowing I’d either have to pay bills or at least organize the mess of papers before I could dive into a new short story served as a deterrent; instead of being drawn to my writing space, I actively avoided it. I didn’t get much writing done in the first few months living here.

Now, rather than haunting my writing space, all my bills are organized and put away in colorful file folders and I only have to look at them if I pull them out to sort on purpose. With two desks, I have the luxury of reserving one desk to be solely for creative writing projects. If I want to write, it’s always clear and ready for me to start, the moment inspiration strikes me. The new desk also provides more desk space so I have room to spread out multi-page projects.

Do you keep a writing routine? If so, what is your routine?

I recently started up a routine that budgets a minimum of fourteen hours of writing time a week and so far, it’s working pretty well for me. I write two to three times a week on my hour lunch break, write for three to four hours on Monday and Wednesday nights after work, and try to write at least five hours total over the weekend. To make this work–and to really get myself to stick to the schedule–I had to create a color-blocked Excel spreadsheet. Checking in with it helps me turn off the TV or put down the book I’m reading during official “writing time” and focus. I originally scheduled myself to wake up an hour earlier a few mornings a week to squeeze in some writing before work, but it ended up being a false hope. I admire those writers who can wake up at 5 AM to write for four hours before starting the rest of their day!

What’s something unique and interesting about your writing space?

The most unusual thing about my writing space is my two desks. Not only the fact that I have two desks, but the fact that they are such completely different styles. One is an antique secretary desk that my dad gave me for my seventeenth birthday. It has carved claw feet, a thousand little drawers and nooks, and even has two secret hidden compartments. It has so much character and makes me feel “dressed up” when I write. The fanciness of it helps facilitate the daydream that I’m among the ranks of great American writers, currently writing the next great American [fill in the blank].

My other desk is much more contemporary. It has a built-in filing system for organizing messes of paper, a built-in corkboard which I use for post-it to-do lists and deadline reminders, and can be folded up and into the wall. Even though I dreamed of having two desks in my writing space, I didn’t think it was going to be possible because of how small my condo is (eight hundred square feet). But then I saw this space-saving, fold-up desk featured on Apartment Therapy and ordered it right away. Pure white, its fold-up design is perfect for conserving space when I have company over.

I have one chair for both desks, a classic carved wooden chair that I’ve borrowed from my mom’s office. I wish it could swivel and roll around too, so I could switch from one desk to the other more easily, as I’m constantly swapping desks during my writing time when I finish one task and move onto a different writing project, but for now it’s just right.

If you could have any writing space in the world, what would it look like and why?

A treehouse. One summer, I helped rebuild my childhood treehouse in my parents backyard. We ripped down all the walls, which were rotting and waterlogged, leaving just the roof and the frame. For a few weeks, with construction on hold, I would climb up there to write and it felt like I was in a glass room, surrounded by the upper branches of the forest and the wildlife, and protected from the rain (the best was staying up there to write during a thunderstorm). It was incredibly peaceful and felt sort of magical. When we finally put the new walls up, it felt closed in again, contained and normal like a house, and it lost that special feeling. Someday, I’d like to have a writing treehouse like that again.

Hannah Karena Jones is an assistant editor by day and a YA, middle grade, historical, and memoir writer by night. Her writing has appeared in The Susquehanna Review and Weave Magazine, among others, and has been awarded Honorable Mention in the Writer’s Digest Young Adult Fiction Competition. Her book, Byberry State Hospital, is forthcoming from Arcadia Publishing. She blogs about writing and publishing at The (Writer’s) Waiting Room and tweets about everything @HannahKarena10.

Where Writers Write: Dave Ursillo

This week’s Where Writer’s Write post comes to us from Dave Ursillo, a fellow Rhode Island native &  writer. If you have a rockin’ writing space you’d like to share with us, email me at kristinoffilerwrites@gmail.com.

I love to write on a subject I call, “alternative leadership.”

Alternative leadership is at the crossroads of self-realization (beyond the stigmas of self-help, not personal development, but genuinely realizing the power and beauty and limitless capabilities we all possess) and leadership (redefining what it means to be a leader and helping people reclaim the title of leadership for themselves, in any walk of life, to genuinely help people).

My writing tends to take a very personal tone, sometimes drifts into either a very poetic/prose form or, conversely, can take up a strong edginess. It evokes a lot of emotion in readers, and often treats topics of social behavior, group interactions, and how we lead our lives.

What is your writing space like?

Simple, practical. Peaceful, zen, ohm. Whether at home or on the road, at my desk or in a coffee shop, I always seek out a writing space that is an environment that serves my writing frame of mind: giving, open, sharp, poetic, creative, valuable. 
At home, I like to keep sparse reminders within eye-shot like notes-to-self (currently notes like, “Feeling precedes, then facilitates, action.” and “Serve strengths, measure in ease, simplicity, joy.”) and inspiring books (poetry from Hafiz and Rumi, Emerson and Thoreau, works from the Dalai Lama and more), which always litter my desk. I like to have brilliant words surround me. They serve as great queues for my writing: pushing myself to up the ante and truly serve others with the words I write.
 

Do you keep writing routine? If so, what is your routine?

I keep a very strict routine of keeping no writing routine at all. Like Orwell’s 6th rule of writing, break any of your own rules when they don’t serve you. Routines make me feel boxed in, and with an art form like writing I believe that you need to go when the flow strikes. 
I try to write every day, but often there are stretches when I don’t write for a few days. I really enjoy writing when I feel it, instead of trying to “will” it. I don’t subscribe to the tortured artist routine or believe in writer’s block — writers tend to keep to many self-imposed rules, restrictions, preconceived notions about their craft which only complicates things. Just be open, clear your mind, and flow.
 

What’s something unique and interesting about your writing space?

Today my writing space is pretty make-shift and made to travel: to move, to breathe in new scenes, to experience new faces and see life being lived. That fuels my writing. I’m a nonfiction writer so experiencing people and regular, ordinary living situations serves as incredible and endless inspiration to me.
  

If you could have any writing space in the world, what would it look like and why?

Writing overlooking the water — or any scene that screams “life.” A New York City street currently screams life to me when I write these days. I love the scene of a quiet beach just as much — different views, but they all serve my writing purpose: give, give, give.
Dave Ursillo is a former politico insider turned alternative leadership writer, author and speaker. His debut nonfiction title, Lead Without Followers, is a personal tale and political analysis of what it means to be a leader in today’s desperate world. He speaks, offers 1-on-1 leadership coaching and blogs at DaveUrsillo.com.

Where Writers Write: Ollin Morales

This week’s Where Writer’s Write post comes to us from Ollin Morales, a writer with a very unique take on writing spaces. If you have a rockin’ writing space you’d like to share with us, email me at kristinoffilerwrites@gmail.com.

I started a blog about two years ago (Courage 2 Create) chronicling the process of writing my first novel. I had no idea that people would read the blog, but not only did people start reading it, they liked it. They really liked it. The blog has become so much bigger than my own private little journey and me: it’s gone on to inspire others to follow their own passions.

The blog seeks to inspire people to create the kind of artistic work they want, and create the kind of life they want. When I began, I was writing the blog for myself. My intention was to get myself to write my novel (I had been postponing it for about two years). That really was how I started.

No grand dreams. I thought that maybe, in 5-10 years I’d get someone besides my sister to read it. But other than that, I really didn’t think anything would come of it.

But, as the blog grew, I began to commit myself more and more to helping people do what I had done, because I realized that me and my readers were both on similar journeys. I realized that my personal struggles weren’t personal at all. They were universal.

What is your writing space like?

There is no better “space” to write than the space I currently inhabit. It doesn’t matter where it is.

If the” space” where I write were to matter to me, and then I wouldn’t get any writing done. I would place too many qualifiers on my writing routine that way.

 I’d say, for instance: “I can’t write today because I’m not in my favorite coffee shop, or at my home office, or its raining, or I’m tired, or I’m in a bad mood, or I’m missing my favorite red pillow that I like to sit on, etc.”

Those qualifiers are blocks–ways in which I make excuses and put off the writing.

So, the best “space” to write for me is “no space.” Which is another way to say “every space.” Or “all space.”

Basically, I know that wherever I am, I can create the perfect conditions to write. I don’t need a specific space. I can always create the ideal space to write in. (You can do this, too.)

In a way, I am the perfect space to write in.

Thus, in order to get my writing done, I try to inhabit the space of “me” at all times. That “space” is a space of openness, honesty, patience, non-attachment and being.

You might call this response “overly philosophical,” or even “cryptic,” but I call it “incredibly practical.”

No matter where you are, if you ask yourself to be open, honest, patient, and if you ask yourself to not grasp at anything and simply be yourself, then you’ll find that you’ll get a whole lot of writing done that way.

Do you keep a writing routine? If so, what is your routine?

My true writing routine is “flexibility.” That’s the best routine.

I’ve had times when I was writing 20 hours a week, times when I wrote only 4 hours a week, and times when I didn’t write a single word. I don’t ask myself to conform to my writing routine, I ask my writing routine to conform to me and my current situation. This gets rid of a lot of stress on my part. Because my work life and social life are always in constant flux–always changing–a rigid writing routine would have me in chaos pretty much every day of my life.

So, I don’t have a rigid routine. I keep it flexible.

Sometimes I’m just too busy to write, so my routine adapts accordingly.

Sometimes, I have plenty of time to write, so my routine adapts accordingly.

 I recommend creating a routine that adapts to you and your schedule. Not the other way around.

If you do this, I will promise you that you will write with greater ease and peace.

What’s something unique and interesting about your writing space?

That it’s nearly impossible to describe, and even harder to implement, but that once implemented, it creates miraculous results.

If you could have any writing space in the world, what would it look like and why?

I don’t strive for any writing space other than the one I currently inhabit. (The space of “me” that I talked about previously.) To ask for a better one would be to fall into the fatal trap of grasping and attachment. It would mean that I would have to wait for a “the ideal writing space,” and would always be dissatisfied with the writing space I currently have, because it’s not the “ideal space” I have pictured in my head.

There is no writing space that is totally perfect, anyway. A writing space will always have its shortcomings.

The writing space I currently inhabit is the only one I have at the moment. So it is the best writing space I could ever have.

Why would I want anything more?

Ollin Morales is a fiction writer, blogger, freelancer, and ghostwriter. His blog, Courage 2 Create, chronicles his journey as he writes his first fiction novel. His blog offers writing advice as well as strategies to deal with life’s tough challenges. His blog was named one of The Top Ten Blogs for Writers by WriteToDone two years in a row (2011, 2012).

Where Writers Write: Tiffany Clarke Harrison

This week’s post comes to us from Tiffany Clarke Harrison, a copywriting fiction-lover. If you’d love to share your rockin’ writing space with us, shoot me an email at KristinOffilerwrites@gmail.com or holler at me on Twitter.

Fiction is my first love.  We’re in a seriously committed relationship only rivaled by my marriage.  Luckily, neither my husband nor my words are the jealous type.

I also rock web copy for creative women entrepreneurs, helping them celebrate their delicious talents with content that doesn’t bore readers to death.  People can’t hire you if they’re dead, right?  Totally.

My writing space is the 4×3 corner of my bedroom that inhabits the simplest Ikea desk and a glorious garage sale find of a weathered, farmhouse chair.  It is the one spot of my room where unfolded laundry is not permitted, and layers of hot pink, green, Coldplay lyrics and house music are encouraged.
Or, at times, a blank surface and silence water my words with the greatest inspiration-it gives them room to breathe and come alive on the page.
 

What is your writing space like?

 It is uniquely me, depending on what I need that day. If I need a burst of color or a particular sound to help set the tone for my work that day, I add it.  If not, I take it away.  It is uncluttered; a space where I can keep my mind on my work and not fiddle with, say, bills sitting on the corner of my desk.  My go to inspiration books and creative cues are always around (e.g. After You’d Goneand The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao) and help me through the rough spots.

Do you keep a writing routine? If so, what is your routine?

I keep a writing routine for work-I generally write on Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday mornings and edit on those evenings.  My fiction happens when it happens.  (I wish it happened more often.)  I plan on carving out time twice a week for it as well.

What’s something unique and interesting about your writing space?

It’s mine!  I’m reading Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own and was so inspired to claim a space to write and make it mine.  My home is small and this corner of my bedroom by the window is just perfect.  The scenery is lovely year round.

If you could have any writing space in the world, what would it look like and why?

I actually have 2 ideal spaces.  The first is so cliché, but Diane Keaton’s home in the movie Something’s Gotta Give.  A place on a quiet beach, lots of windows and light.  It’s perfect.  The second is probably equally cliché: a small apartment in New York City full of the eclectic industrial vibe.  There’s just so much to draw from creatively in that city.

Tiffany Clarke Harrison is a purveyor of prose and web copy rocker at blahcubed.org. She believes that ladies rock this world with soul-shifting vision, and delicious talents that seduce your face off, and writes to help aspiring women entrepreneurs turn creative hobbies into creative businesses with fun and engaging web content. You can connect with Tiffany on Twitter: @blah_cubed.

Where Writers Write: Olivia Bowen

This week’s post comes to us from brand and copy editor, Olivia Bowen, a super-talented writer I was lucky enough to meet via Twitter (where else, right?). If you have a writing space you’d love to share with us, shoot me an email at kristinoffilerwrites@gmail.com.

 While writing is certainly part of my work, I actually do more editing for clients, which I love. A rather unsuccessful college creative writing class helped me realize that making up stories is not where my talent lies; I am, however, skilled at helping others refine their ideas and expression so that what ends up on the screen or on the page is exactly what the author had in mind—only even clearer and with more sizzle.

As an editor who writes, my space needs to be part resource center, part inspiration hub, and comfortable enough so I can be there for hours on end, but not so comfy that I forget I have work to do. Here’s what I’ve come up with to meet those needs.

What is your writing space like?

I work from home, so I was able to create a writing and editing space that meets my specific needs. My husband recently helped me revamp the office to be more ergonomic—with all the time I spend working at my desk, having a setup that’s kind to my back and neck was a priority.

Because working with language is such a synthesis of heart and mind, I’ve filled my office with objects and resources that speak to both. I’m a sucker for reference books and probably have more volumes on grammar than many classrooms do, but I also keep more spiritual touchstones at hand: a framed picture I took of a Buddha statue in Tokyo, a daruma doll that reminds me to have patience but stay focused on my goals, photos of my family, and a vase crafted by a talented Philly-based potter that I fill with flowers or herbs whenever I can.

Do you keep a writing routine? If so, what is your routine?

I’ve tried to establish a routine in the past, but finally accepted that one of the things I like most about working for myself is having the freedom to write and edit when the mood (or deadline) strikes. A typical day starts around 9:30, but I don’t really “warm up” until at least 11. Editing projects require me to be really sharp, so I try to work on those from between 11 a.m. until 4 or 5 in the afternoon.

Then I’ll take a long break and go to yoga, make dinner, or just give my brain a rest and watch some Law & Order. I’ll usually get back to my computer for writing projects around 8 or 9, when my creativity peaks, and will work until around midnight if the words are flowing.

What’s something unique and interesting about your writing space?

Before I decided on a language-based career, I strongly considered a PhD in art history. Now the art is pure passion, so my office has some gorgeous original artwork and prints. A dear friend recently painted an East of Eden-inspired piece for me (two, actually, but only one is in my office); my aunt created a rich watercolor as a wedding gift; I have a print of Lucca (an enchanting Tuscan town about which my dad is a leading expert) that was also a wedding gift; and a framed print of the Pantheon, my favorite building in the world, that I got when I was studying in Rome.

If you could have any writing space in the world, what would it look like and why?

It would look an awful lot like mine right now—but with a view of the Eiffel Tower, more bookshelves, and a really cozy reading chair. I’ve deliberately created a location-independent business, so I hope that in a few years my husband and I can relocate to Paris for a year or two. I imagine that walks along the Seine, easy access to macarons, weekend trips to Bordeaux, and the spirits of the artists who’ve worked in the city over the centuries could only help my craft, right?

Olivia Bowen is a brand and copy editor. She runs Olivia Bowen Communications, which focuses on helping holistic and creative entrepreneurs refine the language for their web presence—from crafting irresistible bios to proofreading websites to make sure they’re flawless. A nomad at heart, she and her novelist/educator husband live in San Diego—for now. You can connect with her on Twitter @LivBowen or join the community of logophiles and entrepreneurs on Facebook.

Where Writers Write: Charlotte Bumstead

This week’s Where Writers Write post features Charlotte Bumstead. Enjoy this glimpse into her great writing space, and remember– if you want to be featured in the Where Writers Write series, email me at kristinoffilerwrites@gmail.com.

I’ve always loved the way the words act as my escape; carrying me like a magic carpet soaring across whatever landscape I happen to desire that day. Writing has not only become my favorite form of communication, but I also treasure the way one can use the words to capture a particular moment in time. The act of writing keeps me present, yet it also allows me to reflect on the past and to dream about the future. Somehow, the words are able to press pause when I no longer hold the remote.

Over the years, I have developed a passion for using the words not simply to explain my own life, but rather to illustrate the much more interesting and captivating lives of those all around me. I quickly decided to transform this passion of mine into a journalism degree and soon it became an imbedded piece of my life story—currently taking place just outside of Toronto, Ontario. This is where I do my researching and interviewing. It’s where I construct new ideas and sculpt them into stories for publication in magazines or for posting on my blog. This is where I write.

My office view

What is your writing space like?

Colorful, organized and bright (it’s the only room in the house with four windows). Nothing distracts me like a pile of unfiled papers or various notes left in disarray. My desk sits comfortably in the back corner of the angular room. The wall to my left is painted a soft shade of lavender; to my right is a contrasting touch of sand brown. This week’s to do list decorates my whiteboard with various assignments and deadlines. A shiny, black and silver globe is perched directly in front of me, just waiting to be spun so it can forecast my next imaginary travels.

Plants with pink and purple flowers and round, green leaves breathe freely all around me. The smiling faces of those I love sit in portrait form on the shelves above my head. The clippings of my very first magazine articles—one published online, the other in print—are displayed behind the glass of a wooden frame, reminding me that what may be just a dream one day, could become very real the next.

Beyond the photos and frames, a square black screen stares down at me until I choose to flip on the news or perhaps lose myself in a Friends rerun after a long evening spent at work. In the mornings I am accompanied by my favorite mug, filled to the brim with the dark, creamy liquid I refuse to live without. Its rich aroma encompasses the entire room, and somehow the words spill out with ease. In the evenings I settle for a steaming cup of tea until I am forced to peel my eyes away from the bright light of my beloved HP laptop. Although I write best in silence, the soft chirping of birds outside or kids playing in the street can sometimes bring an added effect.

 Do you keep a writing routine? If so, what is your routine?

I find I write best in the middle of the afternoon. I enjoy using my mornings for research, prep and interviews. But the first thing I do when I start my workday (or almost any day for that matter) is read. Whether it be the news, blogs, emails, or the current piece of fiction stashed in the drawer of my nightstand, I read anything and everything that happens to cross my path and catch my interest that day.

My spewing bookcase

Before I know it, ideas start bouncing around and the creative itch kicks in. I take notes so I don’t forget any of these initial prompts, and then I get down to work. I also spend way too much time on social media. I can get lost in a Twitter newsfeed like a toddler on an Easter egg hunt. One treat leads to another and before I know it, I’ve lost an hour of my day. Still, I don’t feel this time is wasted (at least half of it wasn’t); I’m always learning new tricks of the trade online.

Most of all, I keep my routine flexible. There’s always the possibility of a surprise deadline being thrown at me, or an interview that can only happen between 1:15 and 1:30 on a Tuesday afternoon. I stick to an organized schedule because it’s the only way I can balance my time. And yes, there’s a perfectly good chance I’ll end up working after 10pm on a random Sunday night so I’m ready to “start my week” the following morning.

What’s something unique and interesting about your writing space?

I share it with my boyfriend. I don’t know about it being unique, but his desk is nestled in the opposite corner of mine. If we are both sitting at our desks (which usually only happens first thing in the morning or in the evening when he gets home from work) our backs are to one another. It’s nice to have an editor so close by (as biased as he may perhaps be, his feedback doesn’t show it). And although I am often most productive when left alone, the freelance writing life can get lonely, so I find his company encouraging (most of the time).

If you could have any writing space in the world, what would it be like and why?

Like many of the other writers who have participated in this series, I would love to hear the sounds of a lake or ocean nearby. My ideal space would definitely be surrounded by natural beauty—perhaps it would have an extravagant waterfall within walking distance for whenever I happen to need a motivating boost (even a romantic, isolated creek would do). I love sitting out on the dock at a cottage with nothing but blue skies, a mug of coffee, my laptop and a cushioned chair (a setting I hope to enjoy quite often this summer). I find my “wild mind,” as Natalie Goldberg so cleverly coins it, reaches its climax of creativity when it is, in fact, in the wild. But I also love that I can be a bit of a nomad in my chosen career, transporting my writing space with me wherever I want to go—or wherever the magic carpet decides to take me.

Charlotte Bumstead is a freelance writer and blogger based out of Toronto, Ontario. She has been published in various Canadian magazines and newspapers, covering a wide-range of topics. She blogs about weaving her way through life as an aspiring writer over at Charlotte’s Web. She is also an avid lover of all most things social media. You can follow her on Twitter @c_bumstead.       

Where Writers Write: Jennifer Gargotto

This week’s Where Writers Write post features uber-talented Jennifer Gargotto. Enjoy this glimpse into her writing space, and remember– if you want to be featured in the Where Writers Write series, email me at kristinoffilerwrites@gmail.com.

I think every writer has a special relationship with their space. The thing about writing is that you can do it anywhere, so with that freedom comes great responsibility. No, not really, but it does leave a lot of options.

I’ve never really enjoyed working in coffee shops. I hate having to pack everything up every time I need to pee, as well as paying $3.00 for a cup of tea (hey, that rhymed! How Dr. Seussian of me). I really prefer being in my own little scattered space at home, with a full tea pot and endless cold water. I like to play my music loud, take a bath when I get chilly, and take afternoon breaks to go to yoga. I spend the day reading, brainstorming, making videos, writing posts, and bugging my boyfriend, Chase, online while he’s at work to help me with my sites (he’s a developer and a graphic designer, so his skills really come in handy).

Today I have three websites and an online course, so, in addition to those and freelance articles, guest posts, and the occasional interview I have more writing than I can keep up with. I find the more projects I have going on, the more I become a green-tea-drinking stressball, but also the happier I am, the more creative I am, and the better my work is (weird how that works, isn’t it?). 

With writing, you have to pick your moments. When I write for MsMorphosis, which is really personal and deals with really emotional issues, I like to talk to my audience with the openness and entertaining-ness of a conversation I’d have with an old girlfriend over a few too many glasses of wine – so that impacts when and how I write. I often choose to write those posts later in the evening, with an actual glass of wine, once my businesses and obligations are taken care of and I’m just relaxing with Bella and Chase. When I write for Blogging Fearlessly, the work is much more technical, so I prefer to work on it when I’m full of caffeine, alert, and on my A-game.

If you’re a writer, then your writing really has to be an extension who you are. The best way, I’ve found, to do it is to be comfortable in yourself, be comfortable when you’re working, and keep striving to be your best self. Have a writing space that reflects you. The more authentic it is, the better your work will be. I guarantee it.

What is your writing space like?

My writing space is a bit of chaos, but it’s organized chaos. The walls are filled with pictures, artwork, and lots of inspirational quotes (I guess you could say this room is the original MsQuotations). I have stacks and stacks of books and magazines, because I just can’t keep up (and reading is the most important part of being a writer!). I am big on graphs, outlines, and brainstorming – and I’m big on surrounding myself by these ideas, dreams, and visions. I have a bed for Bella, my pomeranian and the best cubicle-mate ever (ok, we work from home, but she’s still more than I deserve). The mug on my desk is for green tea, which I drink by the gallon while I work. I’m also in a Canada Dry sparking water phase ever since I gave up diet coke, so I’m drinking that by the (enormous) bottle as well.

Do you keep a writing routine?  If so, what is your routine?

Hmmm… yes and no. I have deadlines – Monday interviews for Blogging Fearlessly, two posts a week on each Blogging Fearlessly and MsMorphosis, regular newsletters, guest posts, and content creation for my course that I’m launching this summer; Love, Sex, and Blogging. I also do the occasional freelance article, so that needs to be on a calendar too.  Besides that, my routine is to waddle over from my bedroom to this desk everyday, get up occasionally for tea/water/food/yoga, and besides that just sit here until the work is done (sometimes by 6 pm, often until 9).

What’s something unique and interesting about your writing space?

For better or worse, it’s the fullest expression of me. I literally live in this little room, and there’s more magic that happens here than anywhere else in my (professional) life. I love having my own quiet work space, and I’m honored to live in a time where we can make a living writing from home and creating things.

 If you could have any writing space in the world, what would it look like and why?

If I could have any writing space in the world it would either be a little cottage in the south of France or a treehouse in the middle of a forest somewhere. I’ve always been fascinated by treehouses!

On a much more realistic note, my boyfriend and I are moving into a little house in a few months where we’re going to put together a far more structured office (with bookshelves and adult things like that) so that will be wonderful. Sharing the work I love in a (more organized space) with the person I love? It doesn’t get much better than that.

Jennifer Gargotto is a blogger, vlogger, writer and entrepreneur living in Denver, Colorado. She’s the writer and founder of MsMorphosis.comMsQuotations.com, and BloggingFearlessly.com – so if you’re interested in personal development, inspirational quotes, or growing personally or professionally online she’s your girl. Her current obsession is building her Sex, Love, and Blogging course – about discovering your passions and leveraging them to make money, build relationships, and fall in love with life – which is getting ready for release in summer 2012. If this sounds like something you could be into, get on the list at sexandblogging.com.